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What is poverty in Samoa?





What real poverty looks like
By Tupuola Terry Tavita

Real poverty is not having any food, no water, no clothes, no access to medical treatment and no home.

This is Prime Minister Tuilaepa Sailele Maliegaois definition of poverty, that has become somewhat of an issue raised by several media outlets.

When I was in America supposedly the wealthiest country in the world I saw many people on the streets walking around with all their belongings tied in a sheet and strung on the shoulder like a knapsack. They sleep on park benches or under bridges when it rains. That is real poverty you dont find in Samoa.

Every Samoan has claim to land. There are plenty of mangoes, pawpaws, bananas and breadfruit falling off and rotting on the ground. Plenty of fish in the sea.

The problem is too many people are coming into town and loathing around. They are lazy and do not want to go back to their village to work the land. They should stay in their village where their lands are and develop it.

Tuilaepa says that some Samoans think that not having car, a tv or a European house is poverty.

Those are luxuries. Having none of those is certainly not poverty.







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Sounds like a definition I'd agree with!

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Sao lelei le palemia about this one , very good boy STUI its about time you said something right.Samoas are crying out for money but yet , they are sitting on a multitude of cash .All they have to do is cultivate that land and turn it into cash. YOU can have anything you want if you work out that big land .But they just too blind to see it, all because of being lazy ass and want to live a life styles of relying and depending on people from overseas .But if you think about it , that land will give/buy you anything in this world if you want it.Knowing the Samoa kind of plantation , e fifty meters loa le LAFO , ku loa ma u'u le guku ma le ofo ma faapea ,OKA SE KELE O LOU MAUMAGA , lol.And they only plant one crop or two , but if they think big and plant every plant ,crops,and tree that is eatable ,ia ga vaai lea i ai e kumu le makeki i le uka , koe kumu le ako i kupe , koe kumu ma le toilet i le ki'o soo.
KUU gei lou paie Sosai ma lou faainaelo Spade ma lou taa solo i luga i le forum , ae alu e toto se talo e a'i lelei ai le tama o o'e.Ona maua lea e oe o le faamanuiaga ma sou toalua lelei ,nai lo le sau o oe fesuisuia'i solo mai ou usernames ma fia susu solo oe i luga o le forum ma le mataga.pei oe e leai sou aiga ma ni ou matua , e avatu se upu lelei ia te oe.tuu lou ola i se olaga pepelo ma le tau faasese faapena, ae toaga e fai le maumaga.

-- Edited by reeal-deel on Tuesday 24th of January 2012 07:46:08 PM

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Samoa not immune, Governor warns
on 24-01-2012 08:15

By Taina Kami Enoka

Governor of the Central Bank, Atalina Ainuu-Enari.

The Governor of the Central Bank, Atalina Ainuu-Enari, has warned that Samoa is not immune to the rising intensity and regularity of the global [financial] crisis.

The warning comes as fear grow around the world about the risk of another global financial crisis, which is forecasted to be worse than the one in 2008 and 2009.

We are living in very interesting times where there is rising intensity and regularity of global crisis and Samoa is not immune to these shocks. The question is how Samoa could improve resilience to these external shocks?

To strengthen shock resilience, Mrs Ainuu-Enari says that Samoa needs to step up the rebuilding of policy buffers and implement growth-oriented structural reforms for a sustainable pro-poor and inclusive growth. She says focus should be on the revival of agriculture and strengthening of the export sector.

This, she adds, could be the key in lifting long term growth potential.
The Governor told the Samoa Observer that the impact of a second round of global recession on Samoa would occur through spillovers from Australia and New Zealand.

Samoa has a large exposure to Australia and New Zealand through trade, tourism, remittances, aid and foreign direct investment (FDI).
The trade of goods with Australia/NZ account on average for one third of total trade.

Remittances from Australia/NZ account for about 60 percent of total remittances in Samoa. Thus this would be one of the main channels of contagion in Samoa.
Tourist arrivals from Australia/NZ account for over 60 percent of total arrivals in Samoa.

Tourism receipts amount to about 25 percent of GDP in Samoa. A decline in tourism would also spill over to the broader economy through reduced tourism-related FDI.
Australia/NZ are also the largest providers of aid.
Australian banks have subsidiaries in Samoa.

Hence, Samoas growth performance is strongly correlated to Australias and New Zealands business cycle.
Mrs Ainuu-Enari says that Samoa remains vulnerable to external shocks. Samoa would be affected through falls in tourism and remittances.

Aid flows are expected to hold up well in line with the experience during the previous crises and planned increases in Overseas Development Assistance (ODA) from Australia and New Zealand.

We have accumulated a comfortable level of foreign reserves equal to five months of imports which can provide a temporary cushion in the near term. Fiscal space is limited to prop up growth.

Last week, media reports said that the International Monetary Fund (IMF) would seek up to $US500 billion (T$1.2trillion) in new financial firepower as the European debt crisis increasingly threatens the global economy.

With several European countries veering on recession and Greece on the brink of default,
the IMF said it lacks the resources to be the planet's lender of last resort.

"Based on staff's estimate of global potential financing needs of about $US1 trillion in the coming years, the Fund would aim to raise up to $US500 billion in additional lending resources," it said in a statement.

The World Bank last Thursday signalled a downturn so severe it would eclipse the chaos that followed the collapse of Lehman Brothers in 2008. Deloitte Access Economics director, Chris Richardson, said if there was not a sharp turnaround overseas, Australians were in for a rocky ride through a ''GFC Mark II''.

''If we get a re-run of last time, you get higher unemployment, sharp hits to company profits and a slowdown in the Australian economy without a technical recession, largely due to the momentum in the big mining construction projects,'' he said.

If shunned by the markets, a much wider financial crisis could sweep private banks and financial institutions on both sides of the Atlantic.
"The world could be thrown in a recession as large or even larger than that of 2008/09."


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CommonSense wrote:




What real poverty looks like
By Tupuola Terry Tavita

Real poverty is not having any food, no water, no clothes, no access to medical treatment and no home.

This is Prime Minister Tuilaepa Sailele Maliegaois definition of poverty, that has become somewhat of an issue raised by several media outlets.

When I was in America supposedly the wealthiest country in the world I saw many people on the streets walking around with all their belongings tied in a sheet and strung on the shoulder like a knapsack. They sleep on park benches or under bridges when it rains. That is real poverty you dont find in Samoa.

Every Samoan has claim to land. There are plenty of mangoes, pawpaws, bananas and breadfruit falling off and rotting on the ground. Plenty of fish in the sea.

The problem is too many people are coming into town and loathing around. They are lazy and do not want to go back to their village to work the land. They should stay in their village where their lands are and develop it.

Tuilaepa says that some Samoans think that not having car, a tv or a European house is poverty.

Those are luxuries. Having none of those is certainly not poverty.







True poverty is anywhere but Samoa. Travel around the world and Samoa is the only place that has no homeless people, I am not sure about other places but everywhere else I have been too has homeless people.

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It's actually quite difficult to be homeless in Samoa because there is always a spare fale o'o about where one could take cover.

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Being in homeless in Samoa is an oxymoron.

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