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SAMOAN WARRIORS


I posted this topic so we can all learn more about our Ancestors and our past etc. I am going to list only one name but please add on to the list with the name of the Samoan Warrior and some details about them.

TUATO - A Samoan Warrior of Ancient times said to have killed and defeated one of Tonga's most prominent Warriors.



-- Edited by Manuatele on Wednesday 12th of May 2010 12:51:08 PM

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Fitiaumua- Who conquered Tonga, Fiji & many other islands and set up the Tui Titles in Tonga & Fiji (Found this in a post from last year)



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Lala wrote:

Fitiaumua- Who conquered Tonga, Fiji & many other islands and set up the Tui Titles in Tonga & Fiji (Found this in a post from last year)






Lefanoga the Samoan Warrior who defeated the Great Fitiaumua. The War was faught in Matautu.

The Samoan Warrior Fitiaumua how he got his name - His efforts of Warfare in Fiji he got the name FITIAUMUA or the most superior Warrior in Fiji it was found out that the powerful Fijian Armies and her allies were in heavy losses and could not match the SAMOAN WARRIOR Fitiaumua in any battles of his conquest of there land.

Fitiaumua conquered Tonga, Fiji etc......

-- Edited by Manuatele on Wednesday 12th of May 2010 03:41:50 PM

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TUPA'IVAILILIGI....One of Nafanua's WARRIOR from.... (le alataua i sisifo Savaii)...he took all four PAPA of Samoa ...

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Tuna-Fata

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tama upolu wrote:

TUPA'IVAILILIGI....One of Nafanua's WARRIOR from.... (le alataua i sisifo Savaii)...he took all four PAPA of Samoa ...






Hey TU

I've always wondered about Nafanua's role in the wars over the Papa titles. I remember reading about how Tupa'i went to her for advice, waged war, went back to her for a "after-actions" briefing.

Was Nafanua's role in these wars more of a general rather than a warrior? OR was she already a goddess at the time of these wars and Tupa'i was "praying" for her guidance and good-fortune??

Was Saveasi'uleo also alive circa 16th century??

Hmm just wondering

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Couple of warriors that are hardly talked about are Fua'autoa and 'Ae of Tutuila. Anyone come across any detailed literature on these two?

-- Edited by victor creed on Thursday 13th of May 2010 01:03:59 PM

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victor creed wrote:

tama upolu wrote:

TUPA'IVAILILIGI....One of Nafanua's WARRIOR from.... (le alataua i sisifo Savaii)...he took all four PAPA of Samoa ...






Hey TU

I've always wondered about Nafanua's role in the wars over the Papa titles. I remember reading about how Tupa'i went to her for advice, waged war, went back to her for a "after-actions" briefing.

Was Nafanua's role in these wars more of a general rather than a warrior? OR was she already a goddess at the time of these wars and Tupa'i was "praying" for her guidance and good-fortune??

Was Saveasi'uleo also alive circa 16th century??

Hmm just wondering




Bro if you learn about Savea Siuleo you will see that he was the father of Nafanua now it is said that Nafanua lived around the 16th and 15th Century meaning Savea Siuleo as well as Nafanua aren't as old as it seems.


-- Edited by Manuatele on Thursday 13th of May 2010 11:32:13 PM

-- Edited by Manuatele on Thursday 13th of May 2010 11:32:44 PM

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victor creed wrote:

Couple of warriors that are hardly talked about are Fua'autoa and 'Ae of Tutuila. Anyone come across any detailed literature on these two?

-- Edited by victor creed on Thursday 13th of May 2010 01:03:59 PM






I have heard of Fuaautoa the Warrior who set up an elite Warrior force in Tutuila to War against the Tongans in which they defeated the Tongan forces in Tutuila etc.....

-- Edited by Manuatele on Thursday 13th of May 2010 11:29:51 PM

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Manuatele wrote:

victor creed wrote:

tama upolu wrote:

TUPA'IVAILILIGI....One of Nafanua's WARRIOR from.... (le alataua i sisifo Savaii)...he took all four PAPA of Samoa ...






Hey TU

I've always wondered about Nafanua's role in the wars over the Papa titles. I remember reading about how Tupa'i went to her for advice, waged war, went back to her for a "after-actions" briefing.

Was Nafanua's role in these wars more of a general rather than a warrior? OR was she already a goddess at the time of these wars and Tupa'i was "praying" for her guidance and good-fortune??

Was Saveasi'uleo also alive circa 16th century??

Hmm just wondering




Bro if you learn about Savea Siuleo you will see that he was the father of Nafanua now it is said that Nafanua lived around the 16th and 15th Century meaning Savea Siuleo as well as Nafanua aren't as old as it seems.


-- Edited by Manuatele on Thursday 13th of May 2010 11:32:13 PM

-- Edited by Manuatele on Thursday 13th of May 2010 11:32:44 PM


Nafanua's life time should be around the late 14th to 15th century same time as Levalasi(founder of Aiga Salevalasi) and her brother Tupa'i(Tonumaipe'a line) that fought the wars for Nafanua.. what doesn't make any sense is the Tamafaiga and Malietoa fitisemanu in the 18th century claiming Nafanua being around this time.. that wil make Nafanua 300+ years of age its impossible..?

-- Edited by IesuMoAu OKAY on Friday 14th of May 2010 06:18:13 AM

This Tupa'i is also known as Tupa'i-Vaililigi. (Tupa'i's name "Vaililigi" was founded from the war between Nafanua and Tagaloa Sefaaofonu'u of the Satagaloa family)

Tonumaipe'a Sauoaiga married to Leato Ugauga-a-tui-toga the daughter of Sanalala Lemanu'a of Safata, they begot: Tauiliili, Tupa'i-vaililigi, and sister Levalasi or So'oaemalelagi(the founder of Aiga Salevalasi and her niece & adopted daughter is Queen Salamasina, the first Tupu Tafa'ifa of Samoa).

-- Edited by IesuMoAu OKAY on Friday 14th of May 2010 11:37:03 AM

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Tupa'i Brothers of Ancient Samoa - These brothers were Warriors they faught a War against one of Fiji's most fierce Warriors named Lautala or laucala in which Lautala was defeated.

What is funny is that this whole War derived from Tupa'imatuna's wife Laufafaetonga daughter of a Tui Tonga. She was very unfaithful to both Lautala and Tupa'imatuna lol that is how the War started over this woman.

-- Edited by Manuatele on Friday 14th of May 2010 10:43:57 AM

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IesuMoAu OKAY wrote:

Manuatele wrote:

victor creed wrote:

tama upolu wrote:

TUPA'IVAILILIGI....One of Nafanua's WARRIOR from.... (le alataua i sisifo Savaii)...he took all four PAPA of Samoa ...






Hey TU

I've always wondered about Nafanua's role in the wars over the Papa titles. I remember reading about how Tupa'i went to her for advice, waged war, went back to her for a "after-actions" briefing.

Was Nafanua's role in these wars more of a general rather than a warrior? OR was she already a goddess at the time of these wars and Tupa'i was "praying" for her guidance and good-fortune??

Was Saveasi'uleo also alive circa 16th century??

Hmm just wondering




Bro if you learn about Savea Siuleo you will see that he was the father of Nafanua now it is said that Nafanua lived around the 16th and 15th Century meaning Savea Siuleo as well as Nafanua aren't as old as it seems.


-- Edited by Manuatele on Thursday 13th of May 2010 11:32:13 PM

-- Edited by Manuatele on Thursday 13th of May 2010 11:32:44 PM


Nafanua's life time should be around the late 14th to 15th century same time as Levalasi(founder of Aiga Salevalasi) and her brother Tupa'i(Tonumaipe'a line) that fought the wars for Nafanua.. what doesn't make any sense is the Tamafaiga and Malietoa fitisemanu in the 18th century claiming Nafanua being around this time.. that wil make Nafanua 300+ years of age its impossible..?

-- Edited by IesuMoAu OKAY on Friday 14th of May 2010 06:18:13 AM

This Tupa'i is also known as Tupa'i-Vaililigi. (Tupa'i's name "Vaililigi" was founded from the war between Nafanua and Tagaloa Sefaaofonu'u of the Satagaloa family)

Tonumaipe'a Sauoaiga married to Leato Ugauga-a-tui-toga the daughter of Sanalala Lemanu'a of Safata, they begot: Tauiliili, Tupa'i-vaililigi, and sister Levalasi or So'oaemalelagi(the founder of Aiga Salevalasi and her niece & adopted daughter is Queen Salamasina, the first Tupu Tafa'ifa of Samoa).

-- Edited by IesuMoAu OKAY on Friday 14th of May 2010 11:37:03 AM




I see you understand what i was getting at about Nafanua, Saveasi'uleo, etc.. I know Saveasi'uleo is the father of Nafanua but my issue was with the time period of their existance. Some people have Savea as a contmeporary of Tuiatua Leutelelei'ite, when tracing back his geneaology.

So when did he really exist? 11th century with Leutelelei'ite or in the 14th century when Nafanua consolidated the Papa titles?

Find out when he existed then we can find out if Nafanua was alive in the 14th century or not

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victor creed wrote:

IesuMoAu OKAY wrote:

Manuatele wrote:

victor creed wrote:

tama upolu wrote:

TUPA'IVAILILIGI....One of Nafanua's WARRIOR from.... (le alataua i sisifo Savaii)...he took all four PAPA of Samoa ...






Hey TU

I've always wondered about Nafanua's role in the wars over the Papa titles. I remember reading about how Tupa'i went to her for advice, waged war, went back to her for a "after-actions" briefing.

Was Nafanua's role in these wars more of a general rather than a warrior? OR was she already a goddess at the time of these wars and Tupa'i was "praying" for her guidance and good-fortune??

Was Saveasi'uleo also alive circa 16th century??

Hmm just wondering




Bro if you learn about Savea Siuleo you will see that he was the father of Nafanua now it is said that Nafanua lived around the 16th and 15th Century meaning Savea Siuleo as well as Nafanua aren't as old as it seems.


-- Edited by Manuatele on Thursday 13th of May 2010 11:32:13 PM

-- Edited by Manuatele on Thursday 13th of May 2010 11:32:44 PM


Nafanua's life time should be around the late 14th to 15th century same time as Levalasi(founder of Aiga Salevalasi) and her brother Tupa'i(Tonumaipe'a line) that fought the wars for Nafanua.. what doesn't make any sense is the Tamafaiga and Malietoa fitisemanu in the 18th century claiming Nafanua being around this time.. that wil make Nafanua 300+ years of age its impossible..?

-- Edited by IesuMoAu OKAY on Friday 14th of May 2010 06:18:13 AM

This Tupa'i is also known as Tupa'i-Vaililigi. (Tupa'i's name "Vaililigi" was founded from the war between Nafanua and Tagaloa Sefaaofonu'u of the Satagaloa family)

Tonumaipe'a Sauoaiga married to Leato Ugauga-a-tui-toga the daughter of Sanalala Lemanu'a of Safata, they begot: Tauiliili, Tupa'i-vaililigi, and sister Levalasi or So'oaemalelagi(the founder of Aiga Salevalasi and her niece & adopted daughter is Queen Salamasina, the first Tupu Tafa'ifa of Samoa).

-- Edited by IesuMoAu OKAY on Friday 14th of May 2010 11:37:03 AM




I see you understand what i was getting at about Nafanua, Saveasi'uleo, etc.. I know Saveasi'uleo is the father of Nafanua but my issue was with the time period of their existance. Some people have Savea as a contmeporary of Tuiatua Leutelelei'ite, when tracing back his geneaology.

So when did he really exist? 11th century with Leutelelei'ite or in the 14th century when Nafanua consolidated the Papa titles?

Find out when he existed then we can find out if Nafanua was alive in the 14th century or not


I will go for the 14th Century cause of the Tupu Tafa'ifa(Four Papa Title Kingship) history in relation to Nafanua & Tupa'i-Vaililigi, and the first Tafa'ifa of Samoa Queen Salamasina. And the following genealogy which mentioned Nafanua was married to Tui-Toga Manaia around the same time also..

- Lealiifanovalevale of Palauli married to Fililesalue the daughter of Tuiatua Faasoutele, they begot two girls Popoai and Taufaitoa.
- Taufaitoa was married to Tui-Toga they begot a son Puipuifatu.
- Tui-Toga Puipuifatu married to Pulumatamoana of Tonga they begot two sons Faisautele and Manaia.
- Manaia was married to Nafanua, and Faisautele married to Paenuulasi the daughter of the Tuimanua, they begot daughter Vaetoefaga that was married to Tuiaana Tamalelagi - Queen Salamasinas parents. Tuiaana Tamalelagi is first cousins with Levalasi, their mothers are sisters. Levalasi then adopted her niece Queen Salamasina.

-- Edited by IesuMoAu OKAY on Saturday 15th of May 2010 09:33:38 AM

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IesuMoAu OKAY wrote:

victor creed wrote:

IesuMoAu OKAY wrote:

Manuatele wrote:

victor creed wrote:

tama upolu wrote:

TUPA'IVAILILIGI....One of Nafanua's WARRIOR from.... (le alataua i sisifo Savaii)...he took all four PAPA of Samoa ...






Hey TU

I've always wondered about Nafanua's role in the wars over the Papa titles. I remember reading about how Tupa'i went to her for advice, waged war, went back to her for a "after-actions" briefing.

Was Nafanua's role in these wars more of a general rather than a warrior? OR was she already a goddess at the time of these wars and Tupa'i was "praying" for her guidance and good-fortune??

Was Saveasi'uleo also alive circa 16th century??

Hmm just wondering




Bro if you learn about Savea Siuleo you will see that he was the father of Nafanua now it is said that Nafanua lived around the 16th and 15th Century meaning Savea Siuleo as well as Nafanua aren't as old as it seems.


-- Edited by Manuatele on Thursday 13th of May 2010 11:32:13 PM

-- Edited by Manuatele on Thursday 13th of May 2010 11:32:44 PM


Nafanua's life time should be around the late 14th to 15th century same time as Levalasi(founder of Aiga Salevalasi) and her brother Tupa'i(Tonumaipe'a line) that fought the wars for Nafanua.. what doesn't make any sense is the Tamafaiga and Malietoa fitisemanu in the 18th century claiming Nafanua being around this time.. that wil make Nafanua 300+ years of age its impossible..?

-- Edited by IesuMoAu OKAY on Friday 14th of May 2010 06:18:13 AM

This Tupa'i is also known as Tupa'i-Vaililigi. (Tupa'i's name "Vaililigi" was founded from the war between Nafanua and Tagaloa Sefaaofonu'u of the Satagaloa family)

Tonumaipe'a Sauoaiga married to Leato Ugauga-a-tui-toga the daughter of Sanalala Lemanu'a of Safata, they begot: Tauiliili, Tupa'i-vaililigi, and sister Levalasi or So'oaemalelagi(the founder of Aiga Salevalasi and her niece & adopted daughter is Queen Salamasina, the first Tupu Tafa'ifa of Samoa).

-- Edited by IesuMoAu OKAY on Friday 14th of May 2010 11:37:03 AM




I see you understand what i was getting at about Nafanua, Saveasi'uleo, etc.. I know Saveasi'uleo is the father of Nafanua but my issue was with the time period of their existance. Some people have Savea as a contmeporary of Tuiatua Leutelelei'ite, when tracing back his geneaology.

So when did he really exist? 11th century with Leutelelei'ite or in the 14th century when Nafanua consolidated the Papa titles?

Find out when he existed then we can find out if Nafanua was alive in the 14th century or not


I will go for the 14th Century cause of the Tupu Tafa'ifa(Four Papa Title Kingship) history in relation to Nafanua & Tupa'i-Vaililigi, and the first Tafa'ifa of Samoa Queen Salamasina. And the following genealogy which mentioned Nafanua was married to Tui-Toga Manaia around the same time also..

- Lealiifanovalevale of Palauli married to Fililesalue the daughter of Tuiatua Faasoutele, they begot two girls Popoai and Taufaitoa.
- Taufaitoa was married to Tui-Toga they begot a son Puipuifatu.
- Tui-Toga Puipuifatu married to Pulumatamoana of Tonga they begot two sons Faisautele and Manaia.
- Manaia was married to Nafanua, and Faisautele married to Paenuulasi the daughter of the Tuimanua, they begot daughter Vaetoefaga that was married to Tuiaana Tamalelagi - Queen Salamasinas parents. Tuiaana Tamalelagi is first cousins with Levalasi, their mothers are sisters. Levalasi then adopted her niece Queen Salamasina.

-- Edited by IesuMoAu OKAY on Saturday 15th of May 2010 09:33:38 AM




Are you getting your info from that FONOTI site? If you are that site has so much false information lol I am saying that because there is false info on that site claiming that Manu'a got its name from FONOTI lol

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Manuatele wrote:

IesuMoAu OKAY wrote:

victor creed wrote:

IesuMoAu OKAY wrote:

Manuatele wrote:

victor creed wrote:

tama upolu wrote:

TUPA'IVAILILIGI....One of Nafanua's WARRIOR from.... (le alataua i sisifo Savaii)...he took all four PAPA of Samoa ...






Hey TU

I've always wondered about Nafanua's role in the wars over the Papa titles. I remember reading about how Tupa'i went to her for advice, waged war, went back to her for a "after-actions" briefing.

Was Nafanua's role in these wars more of a general rather than a warrior? OR was she already a goddess at the time of these wars and Tupa'i was "praying" for her guidance and good-fortune??

Was Saveasi'uleo also alive circa 16th century??

Hmm just wondering




Bro if you learn about Savea Siuleo you will see that he was the father of Nafanua now it is said that Nafanua lived around the 16th and 15th Century meaning Savea Siuleo as well as Nafanua aren't as old as it seems.


-- Edited by Manuatele on Thursday 13th of May 2010 11:32:13 PM

-- Edited by Manuatele on Thursday 13th of May 2010 11:32:44 PM


Nafanua's life time should be around the late 14th to 15th century same time as Levalasi(founder of Aiga Salevalasi) and her brother Tupa'i(Tonumaipe'a line) that fought the wars for Nafanua.. what doesn't make any sense is the Tamafaiga and Malietoa fitisemanu in the 18th century claiming Nafanua being around this time.. that wil make Nafanua 300+ years of age its impossible..?

-- Edited by IesuMoAu OKAY on Friday 14th of May 2010 06:18:13 AM

This Tupa'i is also known as Tupa'i-Vaililigi. (Tupa'i's name "Vaililigi" was founded from the war between Nafanua and Tagaloa Sefaaofonu'u of the Satagaloa family)

Tonumaipe'a Sauoaiga married to Leato Ugauga-a-tui-toga the daughter of Sanalala Lemanu'a of Safata, they begot: Tauiliili, Tupa'i-vaililigi, and sister Levalasi or So'oaemalelagi(the founder of Aiga Salevalasi and her niece & adopted daughter is Queen Salamasina, the first Tupu Tafa'ifa of Samoa).

-- Edited by IesuMoAu OKAY on Friday 14th of May 2010 11:37:03 AM




I see you understand what i was getting at about Nafanua, Saveasi'uleo, etc.. I know Saveasi'uleo is the father of Nafanua but my issue was with the time period of their existance. Some people have Savea as a contmeporary of Tuiatua Leutelelei'ite, when tracing back his geneaology.

So when did he really exist? 11th century with Leutelelei'ite or in the 14th century when Nafanua consolidated the Papa titles?

Find out when he existed then we can find out if Nafanua was alive in the 14th century or not


I will go for the 14th Century cause of the Tupu Tafa'ifa(Four Papa Title Kingship) history in relation to Nafanua & Tupa'i-Vaililigi, and the first Tafa'ifa of Samoa Queen Salamasina. And the following genealogy which mentioned Nafanua was married to Tui-Toga Manaia around the same time also..

- Lealiifanovalevale of Palauli married to Fililesalue the daughter of Tuiatua Faasoutele, they begot two girls Popoai and Taufaitoa.
- Taufaitoa was married to Tui-Toga they begot a son Puipuifatu.
- Tui-Toga Puipuifatu married to Pulumatamoana of Tonga they begot two sons Faisautele and Manaia.
- Manaia was married to Nafanua, and Faisautele married to Paenuulasi the daughter of the Tuimanua, they begot daughter Vaetoefaga that was married to Tuiaana Tamalelagi - Queen Salamasinas parents. Tuiaana Tamalelagi is first cousins with Levalasi, their mothers are sisters. Levalasi then adopted her niece Queen Salamasina.

-- Edited by IesuMoAu OKAY on Saturday 15th of May 2010 09:33:38 AM




Are you getting your info from that FONOTI site? If you are that site has so much false information lol I am saying that because there is false info on that site claiming that Manu'a got its name from FONOTI lol


i confirm to you Fonoti didn't get the name Manu'a, where did you come up with that..? and yes i got my info from there and i dont think i seen anything saying that Fonoti got the name Manu'a you must've read it wrong or you making it up.. And you would you have any explanation of the topic on Nafanua?? or you just still trying researching to learn..? enlighten us then with your version..

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For some reason I always felt Saveasi'uleo was from a much earlier time period than 14th century, heck even earlier than 11th century. But I have no evidence to back this up. I just felt being the ruler of Pulotu to be an archaic belief in Samoa.
Most legends that we shared with our southern brothers would, I assumed, be from a time when we practiced the same beliefs. Saveasi'uleo, Tigilau, Ti'iti'i(or Ti'eti'e) etc have their Tongan counterparts in Havea Hikuleo, Sinilau, Kisikisi, etc..
This is the only reason I assumed Saveasi'uleo was from times before 12th century. But as i stated earlier, I have no solid evidence(gafa, pine faamau) to back my beliefs up.

I do agree however, that Nafanua couldn't have existed circa 18th century. Sanalala was much before this time period as well.

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Lutu and Solosolo from Atua, Upolu. Supposedly they were sent by Tuiatua to kill Tuisamoa(Tuifeai) because he was eating human flesh. They killed him and his troops and ended up staying in Tutuila

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awesome, and very fortunate to be learning from u guys about the warriors of the past, keep it coming....

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IesuMoAu OKAY wrote:

Manuatele wrote:

IesuMoAu OKAY wrote:

victor creed wrote:

IesuMoAu OKAY wrote:

Manuatele wrote:

victor creed wrote:

tama upolu wrote:

TUPA'IVAILILIGI....One of Nafanua's WARRIOR from.... (le alataua i sisifo Savaii)...he took all four PAPA of Samoa ...






Hey TU

I've always wondered about Nafanua's role in the wars over the Papa titles. I remember reading about how Tupa'i went to her for advice, waged war, went back to her for a "after-actions" briefing.

Was Nafanua's role in these wars more of a general rather than a warrior? OR was she already a goddess at the time of these wars and Tupa'i was "praying" for her guidance and good-fortune??

Was Saveasi'uleo also alive circa 16th century??

Hmm just wondering




Bro if you learn about Savea Siuleo you will see that he was the father of Nafanua now it is said that Nafanua lived around the 16th and 15th Century meaning Savea Siuleo as well as Nafanua aren't as old as it seems.


-- Edited by Manuatele on Thursday 13th of May 2010 11:32:13 PM

-- Edited by Manuatele on Thursday 13th of May 2010 11:32:44 PM


Nafanua's life time should be around the late 14th to 15th century same time as Levalasi(founder of Aiga Salevalasi) and her brother Tupa'i(Tonumaipe'a line) that fought the wars for Nafanua.. what doesn't make any sense is the Tamafaiga and Malietoa fitisemanu in the 18th century claiming Nafanua being around this time.. that wil make Nafanua 300+ years of age its impossible..?

-- Edited by IesuMoAu OKAY on Friday 14th of May 2010 06:18:13 AM

This Tupa'i is also known as Tupa'i-Vaililigi. (Tupa'i's name "Vaililigi" was founded from the war between Nafanua and Tagaloa Sefaaofonu'u of the Satagaloa family)

Tonumaipe'a Sauoaiga married to Leato Ugauga-a-tui-toga the daughter of Sanalala Lemanu'a of Safata, they begot: Tauiliili, Tupa'i-vaililigi, and sister Levalasi or So'oaemalelagi(the founder of Aiga Salevalasi and her niece & adopted daughter is Queen Salamasina, the first Tupu Tafa'ifa of Samoa).

-- Edited by IesuMoAu OKAY on Friday 14th of May 2010 11:37:03 AM




I see you understand what i was getting at about Nafanua, Saveasi'uleo, etc.. I know Saveasi'uleo is the father of Nafanua but my issue was with the time period of their existance. Some people have Savea as a contmeporary of Tuiatua Leutelelei'ite, when tracing back his geneaology.

So when did he really exist? 11th century with Leutelelei'ite or in the 14th century when Nafanua consolidated the Papa titles?

Find out when he existed then we can find out if Nafanua was alive in the 14th century or not


I will go for the 14th Century cause of the Tupu Tafa'ifa(Four Papa Title Kingship) history in relation to Nafanua & Tupa'i-Vaililigi, and the first Tafa'ifa of Samoa Queen Salamasina. And the following genealogy which mentioned Nafanua was married to Tui-Toga Manaia around the same time also..

- Lealiifanovalevale of Palauli married to Fililesalue the daughter of Tuiatua Faasoutele, they begot two girls Popoai and Taufaitoa.
- Taufaitoa was married to Tui-Toga they begot a son Puipuifatu.
- Tui-Toga Puipuifatu married to Pulumatamoana of Tonga they begot two sons Faisautele and Manaia.
- Manaia was married to Nafanua, and Faisautele married to Paenuulasi the daughter of the Tuimanua, they begot daughter Vaetoefaga that was married to Tuiaana Tamalelagi - Queen Salamasinas parents. Tuiaana Tamalelagi is first cousins with Levalasi, their mothers are sisters. Levalasi then adopted her niece Queen Salamasina.

-- Edited by IesuMoAu OKAY on Saturday 15th of May 2010 09:33:38 AM




Are you getting your info from that FONOTI site? If you are that site has so much false information lol I am saying that because there is false info on that site claiming that Manu'a got its name from FONOTI lol


i confirm to you Fonoti didn't get the name Manu'a, where did you come up with that..? and yes i got my info from there and i dont think i seen anything saying that Fonoti got the name Manu'a you must've read it wrong or you making it up.. And you would you have any explanation of the topic on Nafanua?? or you just still trying researching to learn..? enlighten us then with your version..




Tu'i Tonga Kau'ulufonua II (grandson of the first) married the Tu'i Manu'a's daughter. She was so high in rank Tongans claim she was brought up in isolation treated like a goddess. Their were two sons of this union and a daughter. The daughter was Vaetoefaga who married Tui A'ana Tamalelagi, mother of Salamasina. One son named Manaia married Nafanua. The other son became a Tu'i Tonga named Tapu'osi etc...

-- Edited by Manuatele on Saturday 15th of May 2010 11:36:30 AM

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Manuatele wrote:

IesuMoAu OKAY wrote:

Manuatele wrote:

IesuMoAu OKAY wrote:

victor creed wrote:

IesuMoAu OKAY wrote:

Manuatele wrote:

victor creed wrote:

tama upolu wrote:

TUPA'IVAILILIGI....One of Nafanua's WARRIOR from.... (le alataua i sisifo Savaii)...he took all four PAPA of Samoa ...






Hey TU

I've always wondered about Nafanua's role in the wars over the Papa titles. I remember reading about how Tupa'i went to her for advice, waged war, went back to her for a "after-actions" briefing.

Was Nafanua's role in these wars more of a general rather than a warrior? OR was she already a goddess at the time of these wars and Tupa'i was "praying" for her guidance and good-fortune??

Was Saveasi'uleo also alive circa 16th century??

Hmm just wondering




Bro if you learn about Savea Siuleo you will see that he was the father of Nafanua now it is said that Nafanua lived around the 16th and 15th Century meaning Savea Siuleo as well as Nafanua aren't as old as it seems.


-- Edited by Manuatele on Thursday 13th of May 2010 11:32:13 PM

-- Edited by Manuatele on Thursday 13th of May 2010 11:32:44 PM


Nafanua's life time should be around the late 14th to 15th century same time as Levalasi(founder of Aiga Salevalasi) and her brother Tupa'i(Tonumaipe'a line) that fought the wars for Nafanua.. what doesn't make any sense is the Tamafaiga and Malietoa fitisemanu in the 18th century claiming Nafanua being around this time.. that wil make Nafanua 300+ years of age its impossible..?

-- Edited by IesuMoAu OKAY on Friday 14th of May 2010 06:18:13 AM

This Tupa'i is also known as Tupa'i-Vaililigi. (Tupa'i's name "Vaililigi" was founded from the war between Nafanua and Tagaloa Sefaaofonu'u of the Satagaloa family)

Tonumaipe'a Sauoaiga married to Leato Ugauga-a-tui-toga the daughter of Sanalala Lemanu'a of Safata, they begot: Tauiliili, Tupa'i-vaililigi, and sister Levalasi or So'oaemalelagi(the founder of Aiga Salevalasi and her niece & adopted daughter is Queen Salamasina, the first Tupu Tafa'ifa of Samoa).

-- Edited by IesuMoAu OKAY on Friday 14th of May 2010 11:37:03 AM




I see you understand what i was getting at about Nafanua, Saveasi'uleo, etc.. I know Saveasi'uleo is the father of Nafanua but my issue was with the time period of their existance. Some people have Savea as a contmeporary of Tuiatua Leutelelei'ite, when tracing back his geneaology.

So when did he really exist? 11th century with Leutelelei'ite or in the 14th century when Nafanua consolidated the Papa titles?

Find out when he existed then we can find out if Nafanua was alive in the 14th century or not


I will go for the 14th Century cause of the Tupu Tafa'ifa(Four Papa Title Kingship) history in relation to Nafanua & Tupa'i-Vaililigi, and the first Tafa'ifa of Samoa Queen Salamasina. And the following genealogy which mentioned Nafanua was married to Tui-Toga Manaia around the same time also..

- Lealiifanovalevale of Palauli married to Fililesalue the daughter of Tuiatua Faasoutele, they begot two girls Popoai and Taufaitoa.
- Taufaitoa was married to Tui-Toga they begot a son Puipuifatu.
- Tui-Toga Puipuifatu married to Pulumatamoana of Tonga they begot two sons Faisautele and Manaia.
- Manaia was married to Nafanua, and Faisautele married to Paenuulasi the daughter of the Tuimanua, they begot daughter Vaetoefaga that was married to Tuiaana Tamalelagi - Queen Salamasinas parents. Tuiaana Tamalelagi is first cousins with Levalasi, their mothers are sisters. Levalasi then adopted her niece Queen Salamasina.

-- Edited by IesuMoAu OKAY on Saturday 15th of May 2010 09:33:38 AM




Are you getting your info from that FONOTI site? If you are that site has so much false information lol I am saying that because there is false info on that site claiming that Manu'a got its name from FONOTI lol


i confirm to you Fonoti didn't get the name Manu'a, where did you come up with that..? and yes i got my info from there and i dont think i seen anything saying that Fonoti got the name Manu'a you must've read it wrong or you making it up.. And you would you have any explanation of the topic on Nafanua?? or you just still trying researching to learn..? enlighten us then with your version..




Tu'i Tonga Kau'ulufonua II (grandson of the first) married the Tu'i Manu'a's daughter. She was so high in rank Tongans claim she was brought up in isolation treated like a goddess. Their were two sons of this union and a daughter. The daughter was Vaetoefaga who married Tui A'ana Tamalelagi, mother of Salamasina. One son named Manaia married Nafanua. The other son became a Tu'i Tonga named Tapu'osi etc...

-- Edited by Manuatele on Saturday 15th of May 2010 11:36:30 AM


well, thats that version.. they both similar and we wouldn't know which is the accurate one cause we were never there were we..? but the fact that we know from it that Nafanua was around ageneration before Queen Salamasina's time which makes it 14th to 15th century..

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Another fierce Samoan Warrior/Chief was Tamafaiga or Le'iataua Pe'a. His name TAMAFAIGA is not because he was cannibalistic, it is because he was most inhumane against the people, cruel treatment of the people, haughty, fearless, fierce, and would bow down to no one or see anyone as his superior. This same Warrior/Chief brought the Malo (Seat of Power) of Western Samoa to the Manono Islands.

His cruelty and fierce ways lead to his assasination by the Samoan Warriors of Fasito'outa. What is crazy is that the Fasito'outa Warriors were not satisfied with Tamafaiga's death so they cut his body in to pieces which lead to WAR (A very cruel a dark time in Samoa).

The Samoan Warriors of Manono and other Samoan Warriors who were allies with Manono waged War on the A'ana people. The Samoan Warriors of Manono and there allies defeated A'ana Warriors and captured over 400+ people etc.... It doesn't stop there the Manono Warriors etc built a pit called TITO and in this pit was a blazing FIRE in which 400+ people were thrown in this pit alive, men, woman, and children burned alive etc.... Like I said a very cruel and dark time in Samoan History what is crazy is it happened around the 1800's.





-- Edited by Manuatele on Saturday 15th of May 2010 11:54:45 AM

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Manuatele wrote:

Another fierce Samoan Warrior/Chief was Tamafaiga or Le'iataua Pe'a. His name TAMAFAIGA is not because he was cannibalistic, it is because he was most inhumane against the people, cruel treatment of the people, haughty, fearless, fierce, and would bow down to no one or see anyone as his superior. This same Warrior/Chief brought the Malo (Seat of Power) of Western Samoa to the Manono Islands.

His cruelty and fierce ways lead to his assasination by the Samoan Warriors of Fasito'outa. What is crazy is that the Fasito'outa Warriors were not satisfied with Tamafaiga's death so they cut his body in to pieces which lead to WAR (A very cruel a dark time in Samoa).

The Samoan Warriors of Manono and other Samoan Warriors who were allies with Manono waged War on the A'ana people. The Samoan Warriors of Manono and there allies defeated A'ana Warriors and captured over 400+ people etc.... It doesn't stop there the Manono Warriors etc built a pit called TITO and in this pit was a blazing FIRE in which 400+ people were thrown in this pit alive, men, woman, and children burned alive etc.... Like I said a very cruel and dark time in Samoan History what is crazy is it happened around the 1800's.


-- Edited by Manuatele on Saturday 15th of May 2010 11:54:45 AM




i thought the "tala lelei(Christian Religion)" came in to play in the 1800's John Wiiliams in 1830..?

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IesuMoAu OKAY wrote:

Manuatele wrote:

Another fierce Samoan Warrior/Chief was Tamafaiga or Le'iataua Pe'a. His name TAMAFAIGA is not because he was cannibalistic, it is because he was most inhumane against the people, cruel treatment of the people, haughty, fearless, fierce, and would bow down to no one or see anyone as his superior. This same Warrior/Chief brought the Malo (Seat of Power) of Western Samoa to the Manono Islands.

His cruelty and fierce ways lead to his assasination by the Samoan Warriors of Fasito'outa. What is crazy is that the Fasito'outa Warriors were not satisfied with Tamafaiga's death so they cut his body in to pieces which lead to WAR (A very cruel a dark time in Samoa).

The Samoan Warriors of Manono and other Samoan Warriors who were allies with Manono waged War on the A'ana people. The Samoan Warriors of Manono and there allies defeated A'ana Warriors and captured over 400+ people etc.... It doesn't stop there the Manono Warriors etc built a pit called TITO and in this pit was a blazing FIRE in which 400+ people were thrown in this pit alive, men, woman, and children burned alive etc.... Like I said a very cruel and dark time in Samoan History what is crazy is it happened around the 1800's.


-- Edited by Manuatele on Saturday 15th of May 2010 11:54:45 AM




i thought the "tala lelei(Christian Religion)" came in to play in the 1800's John Wiiliams in 1830..?




Louis Becke wrote:

The A'ana people at this time were suffering from the tyranny of Manono, a small island which boasted of the fact of its being the birthplace and home of nearly all the ruling chiefs of Samoa, and the extraordinary respect with which people of chiefly lineage are treated by Samoans, generally led them to suffer the greatest indignities and oppressions by the haughty and warlike Manonoans, who exacted under threats a continuous tribute of food, fine mats and canoes. Finally, a valorous young chief named Tausaga--though himself connected with Manono--revolted, and he and his people refused to pay further tribute to Manono, and a bloody struggle was entered upon.

For some months the war continued. No mercy was shown on either side to the vanquished, and there is now a song which tells of how Palu, a girl of seventeen, with a spear thrust half through her bosom by her brother-in-law, a chief of Manono, shot him through the chest with a horse pistol, and then breaking off the spear, knelt beside the dying man, kissed him as her "brother" and then decapitated him, threw the head to her people with a cry of triumph--and died.

At first the A'ana people were victorious, and the haughty Manonoans were driven off into their fleets of war canoes time and time again. Then Manono made alliance with other powerful chiefs of Savai'i and Upolu against A'ana, and two thousand of them, after great slaughter, occupied the town of Fasito'otai, and the A'ana people retired to inland fortresses, resolved to fight to the very last Among the leaders of the defeated people were two white men--an Englishman and an American--whose valour was so much admired, even by the Manono people, that they were openly solicited to desert the A'ana people, and come over to the other side, where great honours and gifts of lands awaited them. To their credit, these two unknown men rejected the offer with scorn, and announced their intention to die with the people with whom they had lived for so many years. At their instance, many of the Manono warriors who had been captured had been spared, and kept prisoners, instead of being ruthlessly decapitated in the usual Samoan fashion, and their heads exhibited, with much ignominy, from one village to another, as trophies.

For two years the struggle continued, the Manonoans generally proving victorious in many bloody battles. Then Fasito'otai was surprised in the night, and two-thirds of its defenders, including many women and children, slaughtered. Among those who died were the two white men. They fell with thirty young men, who covered the retreat of the survivors of the defending force.

The extraordinary valour which the A'ana people had displayed, exasperated the Manono warriors to deeds of unnamable violence to whatever prisoners fell into their cruel hands. One man--an old Manono chief--who had taken part in the struggle, told me with shame that he saw babies impaled on bayonets and spears carried exultingly from one village to another.

Broken and disorganised, the beaten A'ana people dispersed in parties large and small. Some sought refuge in the mountain forests, others put to sea in frail canoes, and mostly all perished, but one party of seventeen in three canoes succeeded in reaching Uea (Wallis Island), three hundred miles to the westward of Samoa Among them was a boy of seven years of age, who afterwards sailed with me in a labour vessel. He well remembered the horrors of that awful voyage, and told me of his seeing his father "take a knife and open a vein in his arm so that a baby girl, who was dying of hunger, could drink".

Relentless in their hate of the vanquished foe, the Manono warriors established a cordon around them from the mountain range that traverses the centre of Upolu to the sea, and at last, after many engagements, drove them to the beach, where a final battle was fought. Exhausted, famine-stricken, and utterly disheartened by their continuous reverses, the unfortunate A'ana people were easily overcome, and the fighting survivors surrendered, appealing to their enemies to at least spare the lives of their women and children.

But no mercy was shown. As night began to fall, the Manonoans began to dig a huge pit at a village named Maota, a mile from the scene of the battle, and as some dug, others carried an enormous quantity of dead logs of timber to the spot. By midnight the dreadful funeral pyre was completed.

In case that it might be thought by my readers that I am exaggerating the horrors of "The Pit of Maota," I will not here relate what I, personally, was told by people who were present at the awful deed, but repeat the words of Mr. Stair, an English missionary of the London Missionary Society, whose book, entitled Old Samoa, tells the story in quiet, yet dramatic language, and although in regard to some minor details he was misinformed, his account on the whole is correct, and is the same as was told to me by men who had actually participated in the tragedy.

The awful preparations were completed, and then the victors, seizing those of their captives who were bound on account of their strength and had a few hours previously surrendered, hurried them to the fatal pit, in which the huge pile of timber had been lit. And as the flames roared and ascended, and the darkness of the surrounding forest was made as light as day, the first ten victims of four hundred and sixty-two were cast in to burn, amid the howls and yells of their savage captors.

Mr. Stair says: "This dreadful butchery was continued during one or two days and nights, fresh timber being heaped on from time to time, as it was with difficulty that the fire could be kept burning, from the number of victims who were ruthlessly sacrificed there.

"The captives from Fasito'otai were selected for the first offerings, and after them followed others in quick succession, night and day, early and late, until the last wretched victim had been consumed. Most heartrending were the descriptions I received from persons who had actually looked on the fearful scenes enacted there.

"Innocent children skipped joyfully along the pathway by the side of their conductors and murderers,{*} deceived by the cruel lie that they were to be spared, and were then on their way to bathe; when suddenly the blazing pile (in the Pit of Noata) with the horrid sight of their companions and friends being thrown alive into the midst, told them the dreadful truth; whilst their terror was increased by the yells of savage triumph of the murderers, or the fearful cries of the tortured victims which reached their ears."


* I was told that the poor children were led away as
they thought to be given si mea ai vela--"something hot"
(to eat).--[L.B.]

When I first saw the dreadful Tito (pit) of Moata, it was at the close of a calm, windless day. I had been pigeon-shooting in the mountain forest, and was accompanied by a stalwart young Samoan warrior. As we were returning to Fasito'otai, he asked me if I would come a little out of the way and look at the "Tito," a place he said "that is to our hearts, and is, holy ground". He spoke so reverently that I was much impressed.

Following a winding path we suddenly came in view of the pit. The sides were almost covered with many beautiful varieties of crotons, planted there by loving hands, and it was very evident to me that the place was indeed holy ground. At the bottom of the pit was a dreadful reminder of the past--a large circle of black charcoal running round the sides, and enclosing in the centre a large space which at first I thought was snow-white sand, but on descending into the pit with uncovered head, and looking closer, found it was composed of tiny white coral pebbles. Hardly a single leaf or twig marred the purity of the whiteness of the cover under which lay the ashes of nearly five hundred human beings. Every Saturday the women and children of Fasito'otai and the adjacent villages visited the place, and reverently removed every bit of _debris_, and the layer of stones, carefully selected of an equal size, was renewed two or three times a year as they became discoloured by the action of the rain. Encompassing the wooded margin of the pit were numbers of orange, lime and banana trees, all in full fruit. These were never touched--to do so would have been sacrilege, for they were sacred to the dead. All around us were hundreds of wood-doves and pigeons, and their peaceful notes filled the forest with saddening melody. "No one ever fires a gun here," said my companion softly, "it is forbidden. And it is to my mind that the birds know that it is a sacred place and holy ground."


Yes Christianity did hit Samoa in the 1800's but so did this crazy event.

-- Edited by Manuatele on Saturday 15th of May 2010 12:11:55 PM

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"His cruelty and fierce ways lead to his assasination by the Samoan Warriors of Fasito'outa"

Yeah he was mean but I think his raping of a taupou went too far. It was after Tamafaiga's despicable act that lead to his assination.

What about Losi and Lufasiaitu?? These were warriors who weren't afraid to take the fight to the gods!!

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victor creed wrote:

"His cruelty and fierce ways lead to his assasination by the Samoan Warriors of Fasito'outa"

Yeah he was mean but I think his raping of a taupou went too far. It was after Tamafaiga's despicable act that lead to his assination.

What about Losi and Lufasiaitu?? These were warriors who weren't afraid to take the fight to the gods!!






Of course Lu Fasiaitu not familiar with Losi though could you tell us about Losi?

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itchyballs wrote:

Tuna-Fata






Cant forget about Tuna & Fata the Samoan Warriors who expelled Tui Tonga Talafeii from Samoa.

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Manuatele wrote:

itchyballs wrote:

Tuna-Fata






Cant forget about Tuna & Fata the Samoan Warriors who expelled Tui Tonga Talafeii from Samoa.


Hey was Tuna and Fata half Tokelaun?



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Admiral...are u tongan

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wateva...!


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Manuatele wrote:

itchyballs wrote:

Tuna-Fata






Cant forget about Tuna & Fata the Samoan Warriors who expelled Tui Tonga Talafeii from Samoa.





Isnt it funny how some tongans and
tahitians...now tokelauns claiming
people who are not therz....We all
know its to up statis....They all want
to be like us...lol

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Manuatele wrote:

victor creed wrote:

"His cruelty and fierce ways lead to his assasination by the Samoan Warriors of Fasito'outa"

Yeah he was mean but I think his raping of a taupou went too far. It was after Tamafaiga's despicable act that lead to his assination.

What about Losi and Lufasiaitu?? These were warriors who weren't afraid to take the fight to the gods!!






Of course Lu Fasiaitu not familiar with Losi though could you tell us about Losi?




A legend relates that Chief Losi went to god Tagaloa in heaven and obtained many useful things there. On his first visit he stole a taro shoot and hid it in a secret recess of his body. The celestials searched him, but not finding the plant, they gave him a thrashing and chased him off. Losi swore to be revenged and with some aitu made his preparations. First he sent his servant Vaeau, who was noted for his speed, to spy out the heavens. Vaeau went there and returned the same day.
When Vaeau returned with a favourable report, Losi had some stingrays caught as a gift for Tagaloa. He then went with his companions to the heavens where they arrived before daybreak and laid the fish between the door posts. When the celestials stepped on the fish, they slipped and hurt their heads.
The celestials now planned to revenge themselves on the humans (see above). They invited Losi and his men to float with them down a river which tumbled over a waterfall. This was without any danger for the immortals but was supposed to bring the others to grief. However, Losi's aitu Fulufuluitolo posted himself near the waterfall and caught the terrestrials one by one.
Losi then stole kava, breadfruit and coconuts. The story ends with a fight in which the celestials are defeated and Tagaloa has to surrender six high titles (ao) which were divided as follows: Tagaloa to Falelatai (Pata), Fetafune to Samauga, Lavasi'i to Lefaga, Tuifa'asisina to Satuimalufilufi, Taimalelagi to Mulifanua, Fiame to Samatau.


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